Fight Your Broken Work Routines With the Pomodoro Technique

People try different methods, tools, and approaches to fight their broken work routines. When I inquire people about their biggest struggle as a startup or as an entrepreneur, 8 out of 10 come up with answers like getting punctual and disciplined…

February 5, 2016

General

People try different methods, tools, and approaches to fight their broken work routines. When I inquire people about their biggest struggle as a startup or as an entrepreneur, 8 out of 10 come up with answers like getting punctual and disciplined with work. We all like sticking with our work routines and find it hard to deviate from them. But are we satisfied with it? The hard truth is NO!

The internet is overwhelmed with many inspirational talks. We listen, get highly motivated and then sleep over it. The next day is just another morning, and we get back to level one.

A self-employed person probably understands the worth of hard work better than many people and also fights with distractions the most. A sense of being your boss lose your focus quite quickly. I’ve seen people using some handy tools which help them maintain a regular workflow, but these do not bring satisfactory results.

For quite some time, I’m also struggling hard with the same issue. To monitor and maintain my work, I already use Trello, RescueTime, and Google Keep, but was never relieved till I stumbled upon this amazing technique called “Pomodoro.”

The “Pomodoro” Technique

Introduced way back in the 1980s, Pomodoro is one of the more popular time management techniques which people follow to avoid distractions, hyper focus, and unnecessary long breaks. A user gets maximum attention and refreshes by short breaks. This allows them to complete projects faster with less mental fatigue.

How Does Pomodoro Works?

No rocket science is involved in its working. The rule is very straightforward. Break down every single project into short time intervals (called “Pomodoros”) each separated out by short breaks. Each Pomodoro lasts for about 25 minutes after which you take a 5-minute short break. After four successive Pomodoros, take a 15-20 minute long break. This completes a single Pomodoro session.

The concept of taking a “longer break” is to recharge and prepare for another 25-minute work session. Repeat this process as many times you require and get your project done.

Working in short sprints, trains your brain to have a focus on short deadlines. This way your mind stays fresh and both the span and concentration towards work improves.

My Pomodoro Sessions

I’m one of the beneficiaries of this amazing technique, and I vote it as my favorite productivity method. Initially, I just used my mobile timer to get started. But once I found its effects miraculous, I hunted for a few resources which are something beyond simple timers. My two favorite picks are:

  • With Marinara Timer, you can set custom timer alerts which suit your routine. You can fix times for taking a break and when to start with work. It is user-friendly and quite flexible. You don’t have to install anything just keep it open in a pinned tab (like I do).
  • Tomighty is a cross-platform desktop Pomodoro timer which works for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Once you’ve set the work and break times, your job finishes here. Tomighty does everything for you.

On an average, 6 to 8 Pomodoro sessions daily, i.e. [{ 25×4 } x  6 = 600 minutes] sounds just fine for a reasonable productivity quote.

Final Words

If you’re a developer, designer, freelancer, or anyone who has an extensive and varied to-do list, then do try the Pomodoro technique. I’ve gained quite a lot from it. The adrenaline rush while watching the timer run down spur me to do my job more quickly and efficiently. For every Pomodoro, I maintain my progress via a checklist and by the end of the day analyze my daily performance.

So, what’s your take on this? Do you have experience using the Pomodoro Technique? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below!

 

 

 

 

MaedahBatool

I’m a WordPress Core Contributor, Content Strategist and a Researcher who can turn the torrent of words into something of acceptable length. Currently, I'm a part of WPTie and offering my services as the Creative Director. I've been reviewing several plugins, themes, and frameworks.

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